• School Board Believes "Lynch" Is Offensive Word - Changes Names of 3 Schools

    School Board Believes “Lynch” Is Offensive Word – Changes Names of 3 Schools

    More out of the Communist state of Oregon…

    Centennial School District school board kowtowed to allegedly from Black families over the names of Lynch Meadows Elementary, Lynch Woods Elementary and Lynch View Elementary.

    The schools were all named after a local family, Patrick Lynch, that donated the land for the schools in the 1800s, according to The Daily Mail.

    There was no thought given to the fact of recognizing these families and their generosity, just more political bile that was spewed from ignorant people and sadly the school district didn’t have the courage to stand up to their stupidity.

    “After 90 minutes of passionate citizen testimony and board discussion, the Centennial School Board voted unanimously to rename Lynch View Elementary School Patrick Lynch Elementary School and to study renaming Lynch Wood and Lynch Meadows elementary schools,” reported Pamplin Media.

    “The board considered the name changes because of concern over the racial and violent overtones of the word ‘lynch,'” the report added.

    “There were an increasing amount of questions and some complaints from families of color around the name,” Centennial School District Superintendent Paul Coakley, who is black, told the Oregonian.

    “Our diversity is increasing every year, with families coming in from Northeast Portland and out of state, so [the names] needed to be looked at,” he added.

    Now, to show the absolute ridiculousness of this entire fiasco,  the board agreed to rename Lynch View Elementary as Patrick Lynch Elementary School.

    Well, wait. Lynch is still in the name of the school!  I thought the word was offensive!

    During testimony from those in the community, some voiced their concern over the term even though they knew good and well that “Lynch” had nothing to do with what they were talking about.

    “I don’t think any of you have ever seen a picture where one of your decedents was hanging from a tree,” said one man who testified in favor of the name change.

    “I know the majority of you guys are white and it’s hard to know how that word could have an effect but it does,” added a young student who testified. “If a simple name change could make students feel safe, then why are we holding back?”

    I’m sure both of these individuals are on the verge of a nervous breakdown over the name Lynch being used in the name of schools in the area.

    I’m sure both of these people go into seizures and fits over the fact that five letters are branded in a sign that distinguishes one school from another.

    However, some people had sane responses.

    “It was a family,” said one woman. “Lynch was named for a family, not an action.”

    “We were Lynch, we will always be Lynch in our hearts and I’d like to see the [political correctness] stop,” added another.

    “We have children of color and other cultures and we want to make sure that they are able to cross the threshold of those three schools and be comfortable in their surroundings,” said Sharlene Giard, chairwoman of Centennial School District.

    Those children probably didn’t think a thing about the name of the school.  It was more than likely their racist parents.

    It was more than likely their racist parents.

    Discontinuing use of that portion of the schools’ names is a minor step to ensure “that everybody feels like they belong to this district, and that we can put this potential negative behind us,” said Board Vice Chair Pam Shields who added that she is ‘very comfortable” with changing the school names.

    Of course, she is.  She seems to have no appreciation for her history nor for the generosity of the Lynch family.

    There’s nothing negative about a person’s last name!

    Why don’t these people demand former Attorney General and criminal Loretta Lynch change her last name so the country wouldn’t be offended at her name because it might remind people of hangings in the 1800s?

    My goodness!

    The great-great grandson of Patrick Lynch spoke out, though he did not attend the meeting.

    “I think my grandfather would have liked me to stand up for the family name a little bit,” said David Hayes. “[Schools] are in the business of education so they should be able to educate people that a name and history have a certain meaning versus what other people have tried to turn it into.”

    “[Schools] are in the business of education so they should be able to educate people that a name and history have a certain meaning versus what other people have tried to turn it into,” he added.

    Sadly, that is not the case anymore.

    Public schools are indoctrination centers, not education facilities and this little brouhaha demonstrates just that.

    With the rise of the ridiculous push to rename sports teams due to their names being that of native Americans, even though many native Americans actually like it, there is a question that must be addressed in all of this and Daniel Lang asks it.

    “Where does this end?”

    “Perhaps any ‘people of color’ who happen to work for Merrill Lynch should be outraged. Maybe director David Lynch should have his name scrubbed from his films,” he writes.

    “Maybe the residents of Lynch Town Kentucky, as well as 10 other cities across the country that happened to be named “Lynchburg” should vote to change the names of their communities. Maybe this surname should be banned entirely,” Lang muses. “After all, we can’t let these people be a walking reminder of a terrible crime that they had nothing to do with, now can we?”

    “Once you permit one absurdity, every absurdity is on the table,” concludes Lang.

    Indeed, and we are permitting a plethora of absurdities as we have tossed our moral compass in the US.

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