• Iran deal's fate could rest on last-minute European interventions with Trump

    Iran deal’s fate could rest on last-minute European interventions with Trump

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The future of the landmark Iran nuclear deal hangs in the balance and its survival may depend on the unlikely success of last-minute European interventions with President Donald Trump.

    French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel are to visit Washington separately later this month, and, barring a sudden trip by British Prime Minister Theresa May, will likely be the last foreign leaders who are officially invested in the deal to see Trump ahead of his mid-May deadline for the accord to be strengthened. Trump has vowed to withdraw from the 2015 agreement by May 12, unless US, British, French, and German negotiators can agree to fix what he sees as its serious flaws. READ MORE...

  • Warship Ruse & New Stealth Missiles: How U.S. & Allies Attacked Syria

    Warship Ruse & New Stealth Missiles: How U.S. & Allies Attacked Syria

    President Donald Trump’s outrage over another apparent chemical weapons attack by Syrian President Bashar al-Assad was clear. And for the second time in his presidency, the U.S. commander-in-chief demanded retaliation.

    As images of sick or dying children flooded global media all week, the U.S. guided-missile destroyer USS Winston Churchill churned toward the Mediterranean to join a flotilla of allied warships, including another U.S. destroyer, the USS Donald Cook.

    It was a ruse.

    While both vessels carry as many as 90 Tomahawk missiles — the main weapon used in the Friday evening strike on Syria — neither ship in the end fired a shot. Instead, according to a person familiar with White House war planning, they were part of a plan to distract Russia and its Syrian ally from an assault Assad’s government could do little to defend itself against. READ MORE...

  • Netanyahu arrives in DC bruised but can gain from elections after AIPAC

    Netanyahu arrives in DC bruised but can gain from elections after AIPAC

    WASHINGTON – When Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu takes to the podium at AIPAC’s general plenary on Tuesday, he won’t be the first prime minister under investigation to seek comfort in the arms of the powerful American pro-Israel lobby.

    The first was Ehud Olmert, who flew to Washington in June 2008, just weeks after announcing he would resign if he was indicted as a result of corruption investigations into illegal campaign contributions.

    Olmert spent a few days in the US capital where he met with president George W. Bush, whom he described as a “remarkable friend.” Then, in an address before the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, Olmert urged action to stop Iran’s nuclear program and called on the Palestinians to work with him to achieve a peace deal. READ MORE...