• The Reckless Coverage of Kavanaugh Allegations Is Why Americans Don’t Trust the Media

    The Reckless Coverage of Kavanaugh Allegations Is Why Americans Don’t Trust the Media

    The last few weeks of coverage of the accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have been a perfect example of why the American people don’t trust the media.

    The sheer breadth of wild and reckless reporting on the situation has been extraordinary, even by the media’s increasingly low standards.

    There have been a staggering number of backtracks and incidences of simply false reporting.

    NBC published a social media post by one of Kavanaugh’s classmates, Christina King Miranda, saying: This incident did happen. Many of us heard a buzz about it indirectly with few specific details. However Christine’s vivid recollection should be more than enough for us to truly, deeply know that the accusation is true.” READ MORE...

  • Attempt to Diminish Heroism of Alamo Defenders Is a Shameful War on History

    Attempt to Diminish Heroism of Alamo Defenders Is a Shameful War on History

    The next generation of Texans may not care to “remember the Alamo” after a recent decision by the Texas State Board of Education.

    The Battle of the Alamo, which occurred during the Texas Revolution of the 1830s, is one of the most famed military actions in Texas and American history.

    Just a few hundred Alamo defenders, who hailed from numerous countries and all walks of life, held off a Mexican army, led by Gen. Santa Anna, of nearly 2,000 for hours before being overrun.

    The brave actions of a few, patriotic men against incredible odds has been compared to the Battle of Thermopylae, in which a handful of Greek soldiers fought against a massive Persian army. In fact, a plaque saying as much sits on the wall of the fort today, which is located in the middle of downtown San Antonio. READ MORE...

  • Norway’s Boardroom Gender Quota Didn’t Work. California May Try It Anyway.

    Norway’s Boardroom Gender Quota Didn’t Work. California May Try It Anyway.

    From making war on straws to policing speech, California leads the nation in adopting half-baked ideas from Europe.

    The latest craze is a proposed bill that would force publicly held companies to put women on their boards by 2019. The legislation passed through the California legislature and awaits signature by Gov. Jerry Brown.

    If the law passes, it would make California the first state to have such a mandatory quota.

    The law likely runs afoul of the California constitution and the Constitution of the United States, but it’s also a terrible idea on its own merits. READ MORE...

  • The Sarah Sanders and CNN Saga Continues

    The Sarah Sanders and CNN Saga Continues

    We break down the top media moments this week—and plenty of misses.

    CNN’s Jim Acosta made waves this week when he complained about his experience at a Trump rally in Tampa, Florida, saying he felt like he “wasn’t in America anymore.” But it didn’t stop there. Acosta questioned White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, asking if the media is the enemy of the people—but she stood her ground. 

    Plus: Kim Kardashian is facing backlash from the left and the media after she made what some are calling a controversial comment about the president. The New York Times’ new tech writer, Sarah Jeong, is causing quite a stir after old controversial tweets were uncovered following her hiring, raising questions about a double standard. And Slate dedicates an article ripping first lady Melania Trump about her presumed lack of gardening experience.   READ MORE...

  • 'Father of Texas’ Under Fire in the City Named for Him

    ‘Father of Texas’ Under Fire in the City Named for Him

    The war on history continues in Texas.

    An agency in the city of Austin recently released a memo suggesting renaming numerous streets and roads, removing statues, and generally eliminating references to the Confederacy.

    But the recommendations from Austin’s Equity Office didn’t stop with Confederate figures.

    Perhaps most absurdly, the memo suggested renaming Austin because Stephen F. Austin, the “Father of Texas” for whom the city is named, owned several slaves and accepted the existence of slavery in the 1820s. READ MORE...

  • The 7 Biggest Supreme Court Political Controversies

    The 7 Biggest Supreme Court Political Controversies

    “The Right Side of History” is a podcast dedicated to exploring current events through a historical lens and busting left-wing myths about figures and events of America’s past.

    On this week’s episode, hosts Jarrett Stepman and Fred Lucas discuss the top political controversies in Supreme Court history.

    The Supreme Court hasn’t just been controversial because of its judicial decisions.

    One Founding Father’s nomination to become chief justice was torpedoed, which drove him to depression and attempted suicide. President Franklin Roosevelt tried to increase the Supreme Court’s size to 15 justices. Some justices were even accused of corruption. Lucas and Stepman discuss these wild controversies and much more on this week’s episode. READ MORE...

  • How Liberal Housing Policies Made San Francisco Unaffordable for All but the Rich

    How Liberal Housing Policies Made San Francisco Unaffordable for All but the Rich

    The San Francisco Bay Area is a booming locale, and certainly one of the most naturally beautiful. It should be a fantastically desirable place to live.

    Yet, according to a recent poll, nearly half of San Francisco residents say they want to leave the Bay Area entirely.

    A study from the Bay Area Council, a public policy organization, found that 46 percent of San Francisco residents have plans to move out of the area, a jump of 12 percent since 2016. Of those who participated in the survey, 61 percent said they planned to leave the state, with Texas being a primary destination. READ MORE...