• Brexit Can Reform Europe and Perhaps Even Save the EU


    Now that the global commentariat has begun to recover from post-Brexit shellshock, it may be possible for the frightened and confused European publics to discern a few rays of light shining in the distance. These may flicker out, but there is also a chance that they meld into a beam powerful enough to guide Europe out of the darkness.

    The auguries are by no means all bad. The Tories can re-unite and shape the political agenda. In the process, incidentally, they need not be too much worried by the shambolic Labour opposition. READ MORE...

  • ISIS Attacks Should Be Wake-Up Call for Middle Eastern Leaders


    This weekend saw a series of ISIS attacks across the Muslim world, punctuating the end of Ramadan with bloodshed, and creating speculation about what these attacks mean for the campaign against ISIS. Perhaps more importantly, the attacks also highlighted a key discrepancy: even a weakened ISIS poses a far larger threat to Middle Eastern states than it does to the United States or to Europe, yet these states have been at best marginal contributors to the U.S.-led campaign against ISIS, while their policies inside Syria have fostered the group’s growth. These attacks should serve as a wake-up call for Middle Eastern leaders who have repeatedly prioritized other concerns. READ MORE...

  • Obama Has Lost in the Supreme Court More Than Any Modern President


    Each year, Supreme Court reporters and legal pundits devise a “theme” for the term just ended. They try to connect disparate cases into a coherent narrative about, for example, “the court’s turn to the Left,” the “triumph of minimalism,” or even its “libertarian moment.” Such trendspotting is mainly an artificial exercise driven by the vagaries of the docket; it’s not like the justices suddenly decide to make ideological shifts or alter jurisprudential approaches.

    This term, however, confirmed a very real phenomenon: the Obama administration, by historical standards, has done exceedingly poorly before the Supreme Court. While this conclusion may seem counterintuitive given the term’s liberal victories on abortion and affirmative action—or previous terms’ rulings upholding Obamacare—the statistics are staggering. READ MORE...

  • What Globalization Isn't


    If there has been a bogeyman in politics this year, it has been “globalization.” While Brexit was seen by many as the latest rejection of the globalization that has been the mainstay of international economics since the end of the Second World War, American politicians, both left and right, have also turned against it.

    Donald Trump is, of course, the high priest of anti-globalization. “We will no longer surrender this country or its people to the false song of globalism,” he swears. Bernie Sanders too complains that “the increasingly globalized economy, established and maintained by the world’s economic elite, is failing people everywhere.” And, while Hillary Clinton seldom uses the actual term “globalization,” she often echoes the complaints of anti-globalists, especially on trade issues. READ MORE...

  • Fisher Decision a Disappointment, but Won't Stop Campaign against Racial Preferences


    When the Supreme Court agreed to hear Abigail Fisher’s challenge to the University of Texas’s admissions program a second time, it seemed that the writing was on the wall. Why would the high court twice take up the Fifth Circuit’s rulings in favor of UT-Austin if not to slap down the school’s self-serving and disingenuous justifications for using racial preferences in its admissions decisions?

    Indeed, even without Justice Antonin Scalia, there was supposed to have been a four-justice majority against the use of race here. (Justice Elena Kagan was recused due to her work on the early stages of the case as solicitor general, so seven justices would decide the case.) READ MORE...

  • Fisher Decision a Disappointment, but Won't Stop Campaign against Racial Preferences


    When the Supreme Court agreed to hear Abigail Fisher’s challenge to the University of Texas’s admissions program a second time, it seemed that the writing was on the wall. Why would the high court twice take up the Fifth Circuit’s rulings in favor of UT-Austin if not to slap down the school’s self-serving and disingenuous justifications for using racial preferences in its admissions decisions?

    Indeed, even without Justice Antonin Scalia, there was supposed to have been a four-justice majority against the use of race here. (Justice Elena Kagan was recused due to her work on the early stages of the case as solicitor general, so seven justices would decide the case.) READ MORE...

  • Hillary's Hawkishness Began When She Was First Lady


    It’s no secret that Hillary Clinton favors a hawkish foreign policy. Her views seem out of step with the more dovish preferences of most rank-and-file members of the Democratic Party. And although there were many factors that led to the surprisingly strong challenge from Sen. Bernie Sanders during the primary, discontent among his supporters—especially his young supporters—about Clinton’s fondness for military force was high on the list of grievances. Antiwar Democrats recalled all too well that she supported George W. Bush’s disastrous military crusade in Iraq and retracted that approval only when it became obvious that the mission had unleashed catastrophic instability in the heart of the Middle East. READ MORE...

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