• Sotomayor’s Proposed Multiculturalism, a Good Thing or Bad Thing?


    During a recent talk at Brooklyn Law School, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor expressed, “It is important that we have greater diversity on the Supreme Court” and, “I, for one, do think there is a disadvantage from having (five) Catholics, three Jews, every one from an Ivy League school.”

    Sotomayor is both a Catholic and an Ivy League school graduate. With regards to her reference of the popularized concept of multiculturalism, I wonder, could this perceivably be a good thing for American Government? READ MORE...

  • They Still Ain’t Gonna Play Sun City


    Back during the anti-apartheid era, there arose a boycott movement among performing artists to avoid Sun City, a South African resort. Little Steven (Van Zandt) organized a protest video, “I Ain’t Gonna Play Sun City” to publicize the boycott.

    So, now we are to understand that North Carolina and Mississippi are the latter-day equivalents of Sun City. Bruce Springsteen (whose guitarist Little Steven is) started it off by canceling his NC show to protest the new law there, and now Bryan Adams has done the same in Mississippi. Jimmy Buffett is going to keep his NC date, but says he’s seriously reconsidering anything else there. (Side note: Hey Jimmy, I guess you’re going to order your Margaritaville restaurants to implement unisex bathrooms then, or to otherwise make it clear that transgenders can use the bathroom of their choice. Right? If not, why not?) READ MORE...

  • Revisiting the GAO retirement age debate


    Several days ago I took issue with a Government Accountability study of “differential mortality by income,” a fancy way of saying that rich people live longer than poor people. Differential mortality reduces, but does not eliminate, the progressivity of Social Security, which pays a benefit that lasts for as long as you live. In my piece, I specifically disagreed with the GAO’s analysis of how increasing the Social Security Full Retirement Age would affect the system’s progressivity.

    The GAO stated, READ MORE...

  • Designated Islamic Terror Group files Federal Lawsuit: US Terror Watchlist Discriminates against Muslims


    In an apparent incident of desperation, designated Islamic terror group Hamas-CAIR (Council on American Islamic Relations) has filed a lawsuit against the united States claiming that the US terror watchlist is unconstitutional because it violates the rights of individuals.

    To be honest, though I despise CAIR and Islam in general, they do have a point.

    According to Courthouse News:

    “Baby Doe,” as he is described in the class action, was 7-months-old “when his boarding pass was first stamped with the ‘SSSS’ designation, indicating that he had been designated as a ‘known or suspected terrorist,'” the complaint states.
         The class action includes 14 other named plaintiffs, but the lawsuit notes that “there are thousands upon thousands of potential plaintiffs making it impractical to bring them before the court.”
         CAIR legal director Lena Masri noted at the press conference that it is not uncommon to see babies, the elderly, disabled, and even deceased people, with Muslim-sounding names on federal watch lists.
         The lists include a no-fly list that prevents designees from flying “into, out of, or even through United States airspace,” according to the complaint.
         Another component called the “selectee list” meanwhile subjects designees to extra screening at airports and land-border crossings.
         Like Baby Doe, people on this list “often find ‘SSSS’ on their boarding pa
         “The standards for watch list inclusion do not evince even internal logic,” the sses printed by airline employees which is marked to indicate a passenger’s watch list status to airline employees and screeners.” complaint states, and persons placed on the list “have no means of removing themselves or challenging the basis for their inclusion.”
    READ MORE...

  • Designated Islamic Terror Group files Federal Lawsuit: US Terror Watchlist Discriminates against Muslims


    In an apparent incident of desperation, designated Islamic terror group Hamas-CAIR (Council on American Islamic Relations) has filed a lawsuit against the united States claiming that the US terror watchlist is unconstitutional because it violates the rights of individuals.

    To be honest, though I despise CAIR and Islam in general, they do have a point.

    According to Courthouse News:

    “Baby Doe,” as he is described in the class action, was 7-months-old “when his boarding pass was first stamped with the ‘SSSS’ designation, indicating that he had been designated as a ‘known or suspected terrorist,'” the complaint states.
         The class action includes 14 other named plaintiffs, but the lawsuit notes that “there are thousands upon thousands of potential plaintiffs making it impractical to bring them before the court.”
         CAIR legal director Lena Masri noted at the press conference that it is not uncommon to see babies, the elderly, disabled, and even deceased people, with Muslim-sounding names on federal watch lists.
         The lists include a no-fly list that prevents designees from flying “into, out of, or even through United States airspace,” according to the complaint.
         Another component called the “selectee list” meanwhile subjects designees to extra screening at airports and land-border crossings.
         Like Baby Doe, people on this list “often find ‘SSSS’ on their boarding pa
         “The standards for watch list inclusion do not evince even internal logic,” the sses printed by airline employees which is marked to indicate a passenger’s watch list status to airline employees and screeners.” complaint states, and persons placed on the list “have no means of removing themselves or challenging the basis for their inclusion.”
    READ MORE...

  • Catholicism, Permissiveness, & Mercy


    My pal and sometime intellectual sparring partner Damon Linker makes some good points in his latest piece, which expresses frustration with conservative Catholics (and, I would suppose, fellow travelers like me). The title of the column — “The Retrograde Intransigence Of Conservative Catholics” — tells you where he’s coming from. Excerpts:

    A straightforward reformer of the church seeks to change its doctrines. A stealth reformer like Francis, on the other hand, keeps the doctrines intact but invokes such concepts as mercy, conscience, and pastoral discernment to show priests that it’s perfectly acceptable to circumvent and disregard those doctrines in specific cases. A doctrine officially unenforced will soon lose its authority as a doctrine. Where once it was a commandment sanctioned by God, now it becomes an “ideal” from which we’re expected to fall short. Before long it may be treated as a suggestion. Eventually, repealing it is no longer controversial — or perhaps even necessary. READ MORE...

  • Catholicism, Permissiveness, & Mercy


    My pal and sometime intellectual sparring partner Damon Linker makes some good points in his latest piece, which expresses frustration with conservative Catholics (and, I would suppose, fellow travelers like me). The title of the column — “The Retrograde Intransigence Of Conservative Catholics” — tells you where he’s coming from. Excerpts:

    A straightforward reformer of the church seeks to change its doctrines. A stealth reformer like Francis, on the other hand, keeps the doctrines intact but invokes such concepts as mercy, conscience, and pastoral discernment to show priests that it’s perfectly acceptable to circumvent and disregard those doctrines in specific cases. A doctrine officially unenforced will soon lose its authority as a doctrine. Where once it was a commandment sanctioned by God, now it becomes an “ideal” from which we’re expected to fall short. Before long it may be treated as a suggestion. Eventually, repealing it is no longer controversial — or perhaps even necessary. READ MORE...