• What the history of England’s clockmakers tells us about free enterprise and prosperity


    Next month, May 3, economist Deirdre McCloskey will speak at AEI about her new book “Bourgeois Equality” (on sale April 21). It’s the final volume of a trilogy — also “Bourgeois Dignity” and “Bourgeois Virtues” — that argues it was a new societal respect for economic freedom and innovation from the urban middle class (beginning in Holland, then England) that led to the explosion of prosperity over the past two centuries. Can’t wait to dig into it.

    Anyway, I was thinking about McCloskey the other day while reading “The Discoverers,” Daniel Boorstin’s majestic history of scientific progress. Early in the book, Boorstin presents the history of early scientific instrument making — such as clocks and watches — and how England had the edge over France in the 17th and 18th centuries. It all seems quite supportive of McCloskey’s thesis: READ MORE...

  • Getting a New Lease on Life


    The United States incarcerates more people than any other nation on earth. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ most recent data, roughly 6,850,000 individuals were under some form of correctional supervision in the United States and over 2,220,000 of those were incarcerated in jail or prison.An estimated two and a half million children have at least one currently incarcerated parent. The vast majority of incarcerated people will return to society sooner or later — an estimated 650,000 come home each year — but many will not be prepared to move forward with their lives and will face additional obstacles to becoming successful on the outside, making recidivism more likely. National leaders now face the problem of mass incarceration. READ MORE...

  • School Accused of Ignoring “White Student’s Claims of Racial Harassment” Settles Case


    There’s no doubt that many wrongs have been done in the name of racism.

    But, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    Reverse racism is no joke for white students who find themselves the target of random violence and intimidation inside schools that are filled with minority students, some of whom are vengeful and hateful against those with a different.

    A school district in Long Island, New York settled with a former student – who is white – who sued because the school refused to do anything to stop the racial targeting against him, despite repeated requests for them to do so. Instead, high school years were hellish for Giovanni Micheli. READ MORE...

  • Dept. Of ‘No Comment’


    Now this is funny:

    Transparent, the Amazon-streamed show about transgender acceptance, is having a disagreement on its set related to its new unisex bathrooms. Some crew members are reportedly upset about having to use the restroom in the same space as coworkers of different genders, now that both bathrooms are open-access. TMZ reports the story, adding that many are allegedly afraid to complain about the issue over concern that they’ll be labeled transphobic.

    It’s like being a servant in Kim Jong-un’s palace. You don’t dare complain about anything, or it’s curtains. READ MORE...

  • Dept. Of ‘No Comment’


    Now this is funny:

    Transparent, the Amazon-streamed show about transgender acceptance, is having a disagreement on its set related to its new unisex bathrooms. Some crew members are reportedly upset about having to use the restroom in the same space as coworkers of different genders, now that both bathrooms are open-access. TMZ reports the story, adding that many are allegedly afraid to complain about the issue over concern that they’ll be labeled transphobic.

    It’s like being a servant in Kim Jong-un’s palace. You don’t dare complain about anything, or it’s curtains. READ MORE...

  • All Americans should read Michael Hayden’s Playing to the Edge


    It isn’t often that I finish a book by concluding that it should be required reading for all Americans. Some books are great only for policy geeks like me. But Michael V. Hayden’s book, Playing to the Edge: American Intelligence in the Age of Terror, all Americans would benefit from reading.

    Gen. Hayden has lived the American Dream.

    First, all too often today, the upper echelons of American governance are populated with men and women who went to elite colleges and spent every day thereafter in the bubbles of elite institutions. Gen. Hayden has lived the American Dream. He was born into a blue collar family in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he spent his life until graduating from Duquesne University with both his BA and MA in history. He then entered the Air Force as a second lieutenant, beginning his career in national security. I hope the millions of young Michael Haydens currently living in lower and middle class families across America learn about his inspiring story, as it vividly shows what is possible in America with hard work, integrity, and sacrifice. READ MORE...

  • Libya and the 5 Stages of U.S. Intervention


    The United States and its European allies are ramping up plans to intervene in Libya again, this time to confront the growing Islamic State presence in the country. The eagerness to jump back into Libya follows a five-stage pattern that has become all too familiar since the end of the Cold War. This pattern reflects the fundamental inability of the American political system to accept the world as it actually is, rather than how policymakers prefer it to be. Without addressing this dysfunction, the United States will find itself unable to break its cycle of failure in the Middle East. READ MORE...